Frequently Asked Bathroom Questions


FAQs for showers

FAQ Header Image (Does singing in the shower improve your mood?)

20% of British residents surveyed said that singing in the shower improved their mood, with a further 45% explaining that playing music assists them in preparing for the day ahead.

For a deeper insight into shower singing health advantages, take a look at our dedicated blog on the subject – Shower Singing Health Benefits and Top Tracks Revealed.

FAQ Header Image (Are there any health benefits to singing in the shower?)

Yes, there are a few actual health benefits related to singing in the shower. Research indicates that singing can enhance brain functionality, and is as such a particularly good pastime for older adults to indulge in. What’s more, singing can also decrease cortisol levels to leave people feeling more relaxed after belting out their favourite tunes.

And a good singalong in your shower enclosure also involves plenty of breath control and deep breathing which is favourable for the respiratory system, and can improve lung functionality and even offset asthma symptoms and the like in some instances.

To find out more about shower singing advantages, explore our dedicated blog, Shower Singing Health Benefits and Top Tracks Revealed.

FAQ Header Image (Are walk in shower cubicles safe?)

Walk in shower cubicles are extremely safe. They offer a safer showering experience for those who might find it challenging to comfortably step over the ledge of a standard shower cubicle.

Most walk in shower cubicles feature a low level shower tray, with an entry threshold of three inches or lower, in turn vastly reducing the slipping hazard when entering or leaving the cubicle.

If you would like to know more about the featured elements and benefits of walk in shower cubicles, explore some of our blogs linked to the subjects, such as our Shower Cubicle Buying Guide and 12 Wonderful Walk In Shower Ideas.

FAQ Header Image (Can cold showers help improve fertility?)

Cold showers have been shown to help improve male fertility, particularly so when taken regularly in the morning.

The cold water helps to trigger testosterone, and research has proven that even a week’s worth of cold morning showers can greatly maximize male sperm production.

To find out more, take a look at our blogs, 9 Reasons To Shower In The Morning, and Cold Shower vs Hot Shower – What Are The Benefits?

FAQ Header Image (Can morning showers help improve fertility?)

Morning showers have been known to be linked to an improved level of fertility within the male population, especially so colder showers.

The cold water can help to trigger testosterone, with research suggesting male sperm production can be greatly enhanced after even a week’s worth of cold morning showers.

To find out more, take a look at our blog, 9 Reasons To Shower In The Morning.

FAQ Header Image (Can morning showers help boost immunity?)

Morning showers are an excellent vice to enhance the immune system.

The human biological clock means that new white blood cells are produced more readily in the earlier hours of the day. These cells are then used to stave off potential illnesses.

For further information, take a look at our dedicated blog – 9 Reasons You Need To Shower In The Morning.

FAQ Header Image (Are morning showers better for your hair condition?)

Morning showers are better for your hair and scalp condition than evening showers.

For people concerned with an oily scalp and hair, showers taken at night will not stop the same areas from remaining oily again to some level by the day after. By contrast, morning showers will prevent the issue and leave you with a clean and healthy scalp and hair for the day ahead.

If you would like to know more, explore our dedicated blog on the subject – 9 Reasons To Shower In The Morning.

FAQ Header Image (Can morning showers help with a cough?)

Morning showers can help provide relief from coughing symptoms or colds.

When suffering from such conditions, a build-up of mucus or phlegm can materialize in the chest and throat. The steam emanating from a hot morning shower will loosen up these substances and assist in clearing out your sinuses.

For further information and tips on how to maximize the effect of a morning shower on your cough and cold, take a look at our blog – 9 Reasons You Need To Shower In The Morning.

FAQ Header Image (Can shower baths enhance the value of a home?)

Shower baths can help enhance the value of a home, as it is widely suggested that the presence of any form of home bathtub will make a property a more valuable asset than if it was without.

Though separate freestanding baths and shower systems might be preferred, the fitting of a shower bath will still help to bolster the value of a home.

For a more detailed insight, explore our dedicated blog pertaining to the subject, Bath Or Shower? Can They Affect Your Property’s Value?

FAQ Header Image (Does a bath or shower add more value to your home?)

Shower systems can be considered to be a standard fitting in the vast, vast majority of homes. The nature of their design dictates that practically any bathroom space can accommodate a shower, no matter how diminutive.

To find out more about how showers and home bathtubs are considered in terms of integrity to a property, take a look at our blog, Bath Or Shower? Can They Affect Your Property’s Value?

FAQ Header Image (Does a walk-in shower devalue your home?)

The presence of a good quality walk-in shower enclosure will generally enhance the value of a home, providing it is not installed as a replacement for a home bathtub.

However, by removing the sole bath in favour of a walk-in shower can devalue a property to some extent, as most potential buyers, and especially those with children, will want the home to feature at least one bathtub.

For a deeper insight, take a look at our blog, Bath Or Shower? Can They Affect Your Property’s Value? And draw inspiration from our Shower Enclosure Buying Guide.

FAQ Header Image (Is it better to have a bath or shower for resale value?)

Home bathtubs remain highly sought after for potential property buyers, and therefore are often seen as key to resale value. However, it is not usually an either/or situation, as the vast majority of homes will be able to comfortably accommodate a shower enclosure anyway.

Most single and married home buyers are attracted to homes with baths, in addition to parents or prospective parents, who are highly likely to view the presence of a bathtub as absolutely essential.

Find out more in our blog, Bath Or Shower? Can They Affect Your Property’s Value?

FAQ Header Image (Can lifestyle factors influence whether to take a shower or bath?

Lifestyle factors can influence whether people decide to take a shower or bath to some extent, especially given that the bathing process is largely associated with relaxation and de-stressing.

If, for instance, you’re living a hectic daily lifestyle, and have had a particularly tough or tiresome day at work, you might be more inclined to go for a long soak in your home bathtub as opposed to a shorter, refreshing trip into your shower enclosure.

More information can be found in our blog, Bath Or Shower? Can They Affect Your Property’s Value?

FAQ Header Image (Can showers help with depression?)

Showers can help with depression, especially so when used in a particular fashion.

Starting the shower at a lukewarm temperature, which decreases gradually, is an excellent means to stimulate the nervous system and allow endorphins to release, curtailing depression symptoms in the process.

To find out more, read our blog, When To Take A Bath And When To Have A Shower.

FAQ Header Image (Does showering boost the immune system?)

Research suggests that regular showering can help to boost the immune system over time, especially so for those who regularly indulge in contrast showers.

You can read about the several benefits of hot and cold showers in our dedicated blog on the subject, Cold Shower vs Hot Shower – What Are The Benefits?

And our blog – When To Take A Bath And When To Have A Shower – also offers helpful tips regarding showering enhancing immunity.

FAQ Header Image (Does showering help your hair to glow?)

Showering can help your hair to glow, as it aids in boosting blood circulation underneath the skin via a process called vascoconstriction.

In turn, the body’s blood flow is stimulated, particularly so around the scalp area when a shower system is in operation and you are enjoying full coverage. This encourages skin and hair to glow. For more information, take a look at our blog, When To Take A Bath And When To Have A Shower.

FAQ Header Image (Does showering help your skin to glow?)

Showering can help your skin to glow, as it helps to enhance the blood circulation beneath the skin in a process called vascoconstriction.

As a result, the blood flow of the body is stimulated, especially around the scalp area when you are enjoying the full coverage of a shower system, encouraging hair and skin to glow.

For further information, browse our blog, When To Take A Bath And When To Have A Shower.

FAQ Header Image (Is it better to take a bath or shower for cleansing?)

Showers are the best option with regards to simply cleansing the body from head to toe.

A shower system will offer an even distribution of water to provide full body coverage, all the while disposing of contaminated water. The shower stream will mesh with soaps or shower gels to combat oils, sweat and dirt that may reside on the skin.

For a more detailed insight, take a look at our blog, When To Take A Bath And When To Have A Shower.

FAQ Header Image (Is it better to take a bath or shower?)

There isn’t a set answer to whether it is better to take a bath or shower, as the use of each has their own specific benefits.

For the purpose of relaxation, chronic pain treatment, soothing muscles and fatigue, a bath is a better option. In the interest of a quick, efficient, daily cleansing process, a shower is the way to go.

If you would like a more detailed insight into the various advantages showers and baths can provide, be sure to explore our related blog, The Bath vs Shower Debate – Which Is Best?

FAQ Header Image (Should I take hot or cold showers?)

There are benefits and drawbacks to both hot and cold showers, so it is best not to stick to one type of shower specifically, and instead indulge in both kinds at different times in different circumstances.

Whilst the vast majority of people will prefer the feeling of taking a hot shower, there is a wealth of health advantages associated with cold showers too, so you should try to incorporate these into your showering routine where possible.

Take a look at our dedicated blog, Cold Shower vs Hot Shower – What Are The Benefits? for a detailed insight into the advantages and disadvantages of both hot and cold showers, and how best to incorporate each type into your showering habits.

FAQ Header Image (When should you not take a cold shower?)

It is best to avoid taking a cold shower if you are already cold, considering your body temperature won’t be enhanced in any way, and is likely to lessen in fact.

Furthermore, it is not a good idea to take a cold shower if you are feeling unwell, as the shock of the cold water could pose further problems for your immune system.

Instead, you should look to enjoy the many health benefits a cold shower can provide when you are feeling well within yourself and at a comfortable body temperature.

For further information, consult our dedicated blog on the topic, Cold Shower vs Hot Shower – What Are The Benefits?

FAQ Header Image (How many calories does a 15 minute cold shower burn?)

A 15 minute cold shower can burn as many as 62 calories.

For a deeper insight into the benefits of cold showers, take a look at our dedicated blog, Cold Shower vs Hot Shower – What Are The Benefits?

FAQ Header Image (How long should you cold shower for?)

There’s no set rule as to how long you should take a cold shower for, but generally speaking, it’s a good idea to ease into the practice as it isn’t a particularly enjoyable experience for many.

It is smart to initially start getting into a cold shower routine by turning the temperature of your shower system right down towards the end of a typical shower, until you start to feel a touch uncomfortable.

Try and tolerate the cold shower flow for between two to three minutes to begin with, and you should find you build up a tolerance to the temperature over time.

There’s further help and advice on how to indulge in the perfect showering routine for health advantages in our blog, Cold Shower vs Hot Shower – What Are The Benefits?

FAQ Header Image (What is a contrast shower?)

A contrast shower is a process which involves taking a very cold shower for a short intermittence, followed by a brief hot shower for another short burst.

Usually, it is recommended that those indulging in a contrast shower switch the shower to the coldest temperature possible for a minute, then to a very hot temperature for a minute. Between three and five cycles are advised.

Certain digital showers will be programmable to adjust their temperature automatically within set time frames to make the contrast shower process much easier to regulate.

For a more in-depth insight into contrast showers, and the advantages and disadvantages of both hot and cold showers, explore our blog, Cold Shower vs Hot Shower – What Are The Benefits?

FAQ Header Image (What are the benefits of cold showers?)

There are several benefits to taking cold showers, not least the initial advantage of providing a refreshing and invigorating platform from which to begin your day.

Cold showers also help to tackle acne and develop glowing skin and hair, as well as enhancing weight loss and boosting blood circulation. They can help to combat muscle soreness following exercise, and assist with the relief of itchy skin too.

For a more detailed insight into the advantages of cold showers, and how best to incorporate them into your regular showering routine, explore our blog, Cold Shower vs Hot Shower – What Are The Benefits?

FAQ Header Image (Are walk in showers safe?)

Walk in showers can be considered to be “ultra-safe”. They provide a safer showering or bathing experience for people who may find it challenging to climb into a freestanding bathtub, or safely step over the ledge of a standard shower enclosure.

The majority of walk in showers incorporate low level shower trays, with an ‘entry threshold’ of three inches or less, so the slipping hazard is massively reduced when entering or exiting the shower space.

For a more detailed insight into the features and advantages of walk in showers, take a look at our blog pertaining to 12 Wonderful Walk In Shower Ideas, and draw inspiration from our Shower Enclosure Buying Guide.

FAQ Header Image (Can you use a shower curtain with a walk in shower?)

It is possible to use a shower curtain with a walk in shower – the best style to opt for are those that are either weighted at the bottom or constructed from a heavier material.

The reason for this is that heavier shower curtains will be more effective at containing water within the walk in shower enclosure, which will typically incorporate a low level shower tray.

Take a look at our blog concerning 12 Wonderful Walk In Shower Ideas for further insight into walk in showers and their features, as well as our Shower Enclosure Buying Guide.

FAQ Header Image (Does a walk in shower add value to a home?)

Generally speaking, a walk in shower enclosure will add value to a home, particularly when teamed with a modern shower system in a contemporary home.

That said, this is only really the case when they are an additional bathroom feature, rather than a replacement for a freestanding bathtub, for instance.

Many would-be homeowners will prefer to have a bathtub installed, especially those with young families. So a walk in shower wouldn’t necessarily increase the value of a property in the eyes of these types of prospective buyers, if fitted as a substitute for a bath.

Discover more about all sorts of walk in shower features in our dedicated blog, concerning 12 Wonderful Walk In Wet Room Ideas.

FAQ Header Image (What do I need for a walk in shower?)

A walk in shower includes a shower tray and shower screen as essentials, whilst the likes of sliding shower doors can feature in some versions. The general idea is you can step into the shower enclosure without having to open any doors, though.

Low level shower trays are a common fixture in walk in showers. However, the size of the shower tray you require will be dependent on the size of the bathroom or wet room, as well as the location of the floor joists and waste plumbing.

For a more detailed insight into walk in shower enclosures with trays, or any other walk in shower ideas, take a look at our dedicated blog, 12 Wonderful Walk In Shower Ideas To Transform A Small Bathroom.

FAQ Header Image (How long does a walk in shower need to be?)

It is recommended that a walk in shower spans no less than 36 inches by 36 inches, this inclusive of a bench attached to one of the walls.

Regardless of a shower seat or bench featuring, 36 inches by 36 inches represents a good minimum size foundation to work from to allow for comfortable space for easy showering.

Take a look at our blog concerning 12 Wonderful Walk In Shower Ideas for a more detailed insight into walk-in shower enclosure features and profiles.

FAQ Header Image (Do you need a wet room for a walk in shower?)

A wet room is not a cut and dry certain requirement for the fitting of a walk in shower, however the design of such spaces definitely lend themselves to walk in shower installations.

As the moniker would suggest, walk in showers typically don’t have any shower doors, enabling the user to stroll into the enclosure hassle free.

Walk in shower enclosures will tend to feature a wet room screen in addition to a low profile shower tray. One end of the shower space will be open to the room and provide a perfect spot in which to dry off, with the opposite end, incorporating a glass shower screen, used as the showering area.

For a better insight into walk in shower enclosures, take a look at our dedicated blog, pertaining to 12 Wonderful Walk In Shower Ideas. And explore our Shower Enclosure Buying Guide for an overview of the best shower enclosure styles available overall.

FAQ Header Image (Does water splash out of a walk in shower?)

Doorless walk in showers have a greater propensity for water to splash out of as opposed to walk in shower enclosures that feature shower doors. However, any sort of walk in shower space should be designed to incorporate adequate room to contain the splashback and water flow.

The vast majority of walk in enclosures feature low level UK shower trays, and splash guards can be a favourable addition to prevent water splashing outside of the shower space.

Splash guards are diminutive, triangular rubber fins that populate each corner where the shower wall connects with the floor. Easy to fit, they can be glued into position or tacked on using self-adhesive strips.

For a more detailed insight into all aspects of walk in showers, explore our dedicated blog concerning 12 Wonderful Walk In Shower Ideas.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best material for walk in shower walls?)

Acrylic is widely to be considered the best material for the construction of walk in shower walls, however many will opt for tiling to provide the perfect backdrop to their walk in shower enclosure.

The main benefits of acrylic are ease of installation and simple, low maintenance. It also offers excellent durability and waterproof functionality, as well as a seamlessly smooth aesthetic, though provides less scope with regards to design options than some alternatives.

For a better insight into all aspects of walk in showers, take a look at our dedicated blog pertaining to 12 Wonderful Walk In Shower Ideas.

FAQ Header Image (Which type of shower valves can be teamed with modern showers?)

A few types of shower valves can be teamed with modern showers to ensure prime functionality and performance.

Namely, there’s concealed shower valves, in addition to exposed shower valves, and digital valves for accompaniment with digital showers.

For a more detailed insight into the best shower valves for specific modern shower systems, explore our dedicated blog, A Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.

FAQ Header Image (Which type of shower heads can be teamed with modern showers?)

There are a variety of shower head styles that can be teamed with modern showers.

These include ceiling mounted shower heads, fixed shower heads, combination shower heads and riser kit shower heads to name a few.

For a more detailed insight into the best shower head designs to accompany a modern shower set, take a look at our dedicated blog, A Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best modern shower to use with low pressure water systems?)

Power showers can be considered the best type of modern shower to use with low pressure water systems, given that they combine hot and cold water supplies to reach the user’s optimal temperature.

An in-built shower pump features within power showers, enabling them to significantly enhance the water flow rate which emerges from a gravity fed water system, for example.

For more information regarding all sorts of modern shower designs, explore our blog, A Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best modern shower to use with a combi boiler?)

Modern showers in the form of electric showers, mixer showers and digital showers are all considered to be a perfect fit for homes with combi boilers.

In a traditional sense, thermostatic mixer showers have long been thought of as the very best type to team alongside combi boilers.

For a more detailed look into all aspects of contemporary shower systems, take a look at our blog, A Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.

FAQ Header Image (What are the different types of modern showers?)

There are six main types of modern showers, which can be categorised as thermostatic and manual mixer showers, power showers and electric showers, and digital and smart shower systems.

For a deeper insight into each different style of contemporary showers, be sure to explore our blog, A Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.

FAQ Header Image (What are exposed shower valves?)

Exposed shower valves are valves which are visible by being mounted on the shower tiles.

By contrast, concealed shower valves are hidden, along with any other pipework, behind the bathroom tiling where it cannot be seen.

FAQ Header Image (What is an exposed shower valve?)

An exposed shower valve is a valve that is clearly visible by being mounted on the shower tiling.

Contrastingly, concealed shower valves are hidden from view, along with all other pipework, behind the bathroom tiles where it can’t be seen.

FAQ Header Image (Are rain shower heads worth it?)

The design of rain shower heads enables them to deliver a perfect balance between water flow and water pressure when in operation.

Featuring several spray nozzles, which allow for total coverage and a sensational overall showering experience, they are thought of amongst the very best shower heads available.

Explore our blog, How To Create An Amazing Showering Experience, for a more detailed look at rain shower heads and other styles that help you enjoy a refreshing regular shower routine.

FAQ Header Image (Why do rain shower heads drip?)

The most common reason for rain shower heads to drip is due to the shower heads clogging over time, caused by limescale deposits as well as other minerals and bacteria.

Essentially, the congregation of these minerals and limescale can lead to the small holes that feature on the shower head being blocked and unable to distribute water as effectively. In turn, they can drip when the power supply is switched off.

Take a look at our blog, How To Clean A Shower Head, for helpful tips to combat the problem.

FAQ Header Image (Can you put a shower over a freestanding bath?)

A shower can be fit above a freestanding bath or virtually any other type of bathtub, though certain types of baths better lend themselves to a shower system installation.

Big Bathroom Shop offer a specific range of shower baths, including L shaped baths and P shaped baths as well as freestanding baths and straight shower baths.

For inspiration surrounding the best type of stand alone bath to consider for your home, take a look at our Freestanding Bath Buyer’s Guide. Our blog on How To Measure For A Bathroom Suite is also a useful reference to help you understand if you can incorporate a freestanding bath into a potential bathroom suite installation, or a different type of shower bath.

FAQ Header Image (What is the difference between a wet room shower and a walk in shower?)

The difference between a wet room shower and a walk in shower is that true wet room showers populate a bathroom area with a completely open plan design.

Whilst a wet room shower screen can be used in such a space, the water will flow away via a drain fitted in the floor. In contrast, a walk in shower will usually incorporate one or two glass screens along with a low level shower tray.

For a better insight into all things related to wet room showers, take a look at our blog, Wet Rooms – How To Create The Perfect Showering Space.

FAQ Header Image (What do I need for a wet room shower?)

For the successful fitting of a wet room shower, the bathroom area will need to be designed as a wet room from the ground up.

Basically, the entire bathroom must be waterproofed and sealed, with a drain and sloping floor successfully installed, prior to the commencement of tiling or any wet room shower system fitting.

You can find a more detailed insight into what you need for a wet room shower in our blog, Wet Rooms – How To Create The Perfect Showering Space.

FAQ Header Image (Why is no water coming out of my shower head?)

Old or deteriorating pipework can prove to be one of the main causes in preventing water emerging from a shower head.

A build-up of rust within the pipes can cause blockages and potential breaks, either of which can stop the flow of water from a shower head.

The services of a professional plumber should be enlisted to replace leaking pipes or older ones that have become clogged.

In many instances, a lack of water will ultimately be caused by blocked pipes, so be sure to explore the possibility that they might need replacing if water isn’t freely emitting from your shower system.

FAQ Header Image (How do you know if a water valve is open or closed?)

To determine if a water valve is open or closed, there is a simple general rule you can usually follow.

Basically, if the handle is turned 90 degrees to the flow, the valve is switched off. Contrastingly, if the handle remains in line with the flow path, it is on, and fully functional in alignment with your shower system.

FAQ Header Image (How do you unclog a shower head without vinegar?)

Baking soda is a key ingredient in a bid to unclog a shower head without vinegar.

Cheap to purchase and simple to use, baking soda represents a natural antibacterial cleaning solution.

To use effectively, you should add a small amount of water to baking soda to create a paste. If the solution becomes runny as a result of too much water being added, simply add more baking soda.

FAQ Header Image (How do I fix no water pressure?)

You will require the professional assistance of a qualified plumber to fix a lack of water pressure in your shower system or taps.

Essentially, the plumber will drain, thoroughly clean, then fill up your water heater tank to address the issue. That will enable the sediment to be completely cleared from the tank, and in turn, will restore your water pressure.

FAQ Header Image (Why has my electric shower lost pressure?)

The most common, and extremely simple reason for a loss of pressure in an electric shower system is a blocked shower head.

Typically, shower heads will collect mineral residue whilst in use. Then, after the water has been switched off, the mineral deposits will bond together over time, forming a build-up of limescale within your shower head or pipes.

Our blog, How to Descale a Shower Head, offers a full explanation as to how you can tackle the issue.

FAQ Header Image (Why is my shower running too hot?)

In most instances where a shower system runs too hot or cold, it is because you haven’t identified the right temperature setting for your hot water heater.

Ideally, the temperature needs to be warm enough to prevent the growth of bacteria within the hot water heater, and at the right level of warmth to deliver the perfect temperature hot water flow from the shower.

FAQ Header Image (What time is the best to shower?)

Without taking personal preferences or routine into account, the best time to shower is thought to be in the evening, an hour or two before bedtime.

This is considered to be the optimal time to shower from a hygienic perspective, as you’ll be nice and clean when entering your bed for a night time sleep, largely minimizing the spreading of germs collected throughout the day.

That said, there is also a multitude of benefits to taking a morning shower as well, and it is very much not a case of either/or regarding the best time to shower.

Further insight can be found in our blog, 9 Reasons You Need To Shower In The Morning.

FAQ Header Image (What is the ideal temperature for domestic hot water?)

The ideal temperature for domestic hot water is 120 degrees Fahrenheit, or 49 degrees Celsius, to avoid the possibility of scalding.

Furthermore, if the water heater is set at too high a temperature, it can result in unnecessarily more expensive energy bills from the running water emerging from shower systems and taps.

FAQ Header Image (Why is the water in my shower not hot enough?)

If the water temperature emerging from your shower system never reaches the level you desire, the first thing to do is to check that the temperature setting is correct.

Especially in the case of newer water heater models, the integrated heating elements can sometimes prove burned out or faulty in an alternative sense.

If this is the case, it will often prevent your shower from delivering a consistent hot water stream.

FAQ Header Image (How do you get rid of shower residue?)

Firstly, make your own solution to tackle shower residue, consisting of equal amounts vinegar and water. It is best to mix these together in a spray bottle for ease of use, then add a single tablespoon of dish detergent.

Then, spray the solution onto the soap scum, leaving it to work its magic for around 15 minutes or so.

After this, scrub the surface with a soft-bristle scrub brush, and rinse away with hot water. Dry thoroughly for the best results possible.

FAQ Header Image (What is a reasonable shower length?)

According to dermatology experts, an average shower should last between five and 15 minutes, depending on what you are essentially using your shower system for.

Short, cooler showers are typically conducive to better skin. Contrastingly, the overuse of soap or showering in water that is ‘too’ hot can have a negative impact on hair and skin.

FAQ Header Image (Is it cheaper to run an electric or mixer shower?)

Considering the price of gas is generally around 40% that of electricity, a mixer shower would theoretically appear to be cheaper to run than an electric shower system.

That said, electric showers usually tend to use less water and don’t need as much energy to operate properly, so plenty depends on the typical length of the showers you, or others in the household, take.

FAQ Header Image (Do I need a plumber or electrician to install an electric shower?)

When installing a new electric shower, plumbing and electrical experience is required, considering the new shower system may have a higher wattage than the one you are replacing.

Instead of taking on the task yourself and risking injury, you should enlist the services of a qualified plumber for the safe replacement or re-installation of an electric shower.

FAQ Header Image (Do shower wall panels leak?)

Shower wall panels are non-porous, and unlike tiles, don’t feature grouting as part of their installation within a shower enclosure.

Therefore, they are 100% waterproof and will not leak.

FAQ Header Image (Are shower wall panels better than tiles?)

Both shower wall panels and tiles provide excellent water resistance.

However, wall panels don’t feature grouting, so can boast a 100% waterproof moniker – they are also the easiest option in terms of cleaning and maintenance within a shower enclosure.

Shower wall panels can be fit over existing tiles, and can easily be trimmed to size to fit any bathroom area to perfection.

FAQ Header Image (How do you test a shower valve?)

Once you’ve installed your shower head, switch on the cold water supply and allow the water to run for between 10 and 15 seconds. After this, do the same with the hot side.

If you are performing a shower valve test with air, simply follow the same procedure.

FAQ Header Image (When should a shower valve be replaced?)

The first hint that your shower valve might need replacing is if you notice any leaks in the valve when you switch on the water supply.

If dripping occurs, it’s a decent sign that you should consider replacing the valve. Left to deteriorate further, a broken valve will see you waste water, and potentially cause a growth in mildew and mould. Ultimately, it can lead to rotting within your shower enclosure.

FAQ Header Image (What would make a shower valve hard to turn?)

There are a few reasons that could make a shower valve or shower handle hard to turn, with the main one undoubtedly being buildup.

Mineral deposits from water, in particular calcium, can accumulate over time, causing a blockage on the screw mechanism that would otherwise turn easily.

FAQ Header Image (How do I know if my shower valve has gone bad?)

There are three common indicators that suggest your shower valve might have gone bad.

Usually, the most obvious sign is running or dripping water emerging from the shower system after it has been turned off.

Another indicator is if you are having trouble turning the shower handle, with the problem getting progressively worse over time.

Finally, the shower handle can ‘slip’ or get stuck, and fail to switch on the water supply.

FAQ Header Image (How do I know if my shower valve is broken?)

There are three frequent tell-tale signs that will indicate if your shower valve is broken.

The most common of these is dripping water once the shower system has been switched off.

Another sign of a broken shower valve is difficulty turning the shower handle, which can worsen over time.

And finally, the shower handle can get stuck or ‘slip’, preventing you from turning on the water supply.

FAQ Header Image (What happens when a tempering valve fails?)

As a mechanical item, tempering valves can be prone to failure on occasion. Tempering valve issues can cause a range of problems, including a complete loss of hot water supply to the shower system or taps, lower water pressure, or a reduced hot water temperature.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best size tile for a shower floor?)

If you decide to opt for a tiled shower floor as opposed to a shower tray in the UK, it is recommended that the tiles used are no bigger than six square inches.

By sticking to these dimensions, you can allow for a larger amount of grout, which will provide a level of stability and grip.

The sizing and reasoning is thought out ideally, when you consider how much water will flow whilst your shower system is in operation.

FAQ Header Image (What kind of paint do you use on a shower floor?)

The best type of shower paint to use on a concrete-based shower floor is an epoxy floor paint.

This is the case on account of its durability with regards to water and foot traffic – essential in a shower enclosure.

FAQ Header Image (What kind of paint do you use in a shower?)

When painting a bathroom or the shower walls inside a shower enclosure, you should use a latex enamel based paint.

For the very best results, opt for a high-gloss or semi-gloss paint as opposed to eggshell or flat. Glossier paint will offer superior water repellent properties in comparison.

FAQ Header Image (Can you put new tile over old tile in a shower?)

Yes, provided you don’t have any loose or majorly cracked tiles within the shower enclosure. If the tiling structure isn’t entirely solid and firm, it won’t provide an adequate support for new tile.

You need not worry about the weight of tile on tile – this isn’t a factor.

If only small cracks are visible, you can repair them by simply removing the full tile and replacing it with a fresh one.

FAQ Header Image (Is there a difference between floor tile and shower tile?)

Typically, floor tile has a thicker construction than shower tile in order to withstand furniture, appliances, bathroom fittings and fixtures and regular foot traffic. Most types of bathroom floor tiling also feature extra texture to reduce the risk of slip hazards.

Wall tiling is usually smoother, thinner and generally a lot more delicate. The nature of its make-up also means it is much slicker when wet, which explains why wall tiles are not recommended for underfoot installation within a shower enclosure.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best flooring for a shower?)

Curbless flooring populated by porcelain tiling offers the most durable solution for designer showers.

Porcelain tile consists of denser clays than ceramic, and because it is fired at a higher temperature for longer, the end result is a stronger and less porous material. It’s highly resistant to water as such. Furthermore, porcelain tile is very simple to maintain, which is a key advantage for many homeowners who decide against the installation of a shower tray.

FAQ Header Image (What is the healthiest way to shower?)

The healthiest way to shower is to use warm water – this will provide a comfortable showering experience without drying out the skin.

It is best to avoid using very hot water when making use of your shower system, as this can strip your skin of its natural oils.

Warm water will help to cleanse your skin without provoking it.

FAQ Header Image (Are shower wall panels better than tiles?)

Shower walls are advantageous to tiles in the sense that they are made up of fewer parts. Typically, a shower wall will consist of three panels as opposed to multiple hundreds of tile pieces.

In turn, there is a lower risk of long-term damage to shower wall panels, meaning they are easier to maintain as well as install.

Ultimately though, it comes down to personal preference, as some people will simply prefer the look of tiling in their shower enclosure.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best material for a shower wall?)

Acrylic is widely considered to be the best material to use for the construction of shower walls.

This is the case because it is easy to maintain and especially simple to install, so much so that your shower wall fitting can be completed within a couple of days.

Furthermore, acrylic is one of the very most durable materials associated with the manufacturing of shower enclosures on the whole.

To keep your shower smelling fresh continuously, you can keep an open cup of white vinegar within the shower area whilst it is not in use.

The vinegar will absorb any mould, mildew and drain odours that might build up otherwise.

FAQ Header Image (Does coke really unclog drains?)

Yes, there is some merit to using coke as an alternative method for unclogging a shower drain –albeit it is not the best means for doing so.

Coke does possess a reasonable amount of corrosive power, so you could choose to pour some down a drain and allow it to work its magic before adding hot water for the best results.

The fizzy drink is packed with phosphoric acid, which can effectively tackle buildup that has the potential to clog your drains.

FAQ Header Image (Is it ok to pour bleach down a shower drain?)

No. Bleach is a very powerful and toxic substance, so you need to take particular caution in what you apply it to – pouring bleach down a drain does not constitute a proper use.

Bleach has the potential to react with other substances in plumbing and pipework, and could end up causing further clogging of the system.

All in all, pouring bleach down a shower drain is likely to do more harm than good.

FAQ Header Image (How can I unclog a shower drain?)

You can try three relatively easy methods to unclog a shower drain.

Firstly, get rid of any hair that might be residing in the drain, and pour boiling hot water down the plughole.

If that doesn’t sort out the problem, try using a combination of baking soda and vinegar to clear out the drain.

And if the drain is still clogged at this point, you have the option of using a plunger, plumber’s snake or a chemical drain opener to tackle the issue.

FAQ Header Image (How should I clean the shower drain?)

There are three relatively simple options to attempt to clean or unclog a shower drain.

Initially, remove any hair that might have got caught in the drain and pour boiling water down the drain.

If the problem persists, try applying a combination of vinegar and baking soda to clear out the plughole.

If all else fails, you can use a plunger, a chemical drain opener or a plumber’s snake to tackle the clogged drain.

FAQ Header Image (How much does it cost to fit a power shower?)

Typically, a power shower installation will cost about £500. However, the price can fluctuate to large extents in accordance with location, the cost of the actual shower system and if any extra pipework is needed.

Plumbers will usually charge between £150-200 per day, and can complete the installation of a power shower in a single day.

FAQ Header Image (My shower is quite noisy, is there anything I should check?)

Usually, when a clicking or buzzing sound emerges from a power shower, it is a telltale sign of a blockage within the shower pump.

To combat this, you should inspect the inside of the shower system for unwanted junk and debris that could be jamming the pump or blocking a filter.

Cleaning out this unwanted grime and dirt will help to alleviate the pressure on the shower, in turn eliminating a clicking or buzzing noise when it is in operation.

FAQ Header Image (Why is my power shower so noisy?)

Power showers can be noisy, giving off a buzzing or clicking sound, when the shower pump is jammed or blocked.

This happens as a result of dirt or debris building up within the shower system, possibly blocking a filter or jamming the pump.

Pressure is created by the unwanted debris on the system, leading to a buzzing or clicking sound emerging when the shower is in operation.

To combat the sound, give the inside of the system a thorough clean to rid it of any grime or dirt.

FAQ Header Image (Can I run an overhead and handshower together?)

Yes. It is possible to run an overhead and handshower simultaneously, but you will require a shower system that includes a three-setting shower diverter.

A three-setting diverter will enable the user to switch on the showerhead alone, the handshower alone, or both outlets at the same time.

FAQ Header Image (The flow from my shower is poor, what can I do?)

There are a few potential fixes you can attempt to improve the flow from your shower system.

Firstly, you can simply try cleaning the shower head, thus removing elements of dirt or grime that could be curtailing the flow to an extent.

Alternatively, you can replace the shower head with a new designer shower model, or install a shower pump or pressurised unvented cylinder.

Other options are to invest in an electric shower or a power shower which guarantee a stronger flow rate than that provided by your existing shower.

Our blog article, What Is A Power Shower, explains the advantages of this type of shower system in greater detail.

FAQ Header Image (How can I increase my shower's water pressure?)

For an existing shower, you can give the shower head a thorough clean, ridding it of any dirt or debris that might be halting a free flow of water from emerging.

Alternate options include replacing the shower head with a new model or installing a shower pump or pressurised unvented cylinder.

Or, you could go for a full-scale change by purchasing an electric shower or power shower with a guaranteed superior flow rate to your existing model.

The virtues of the latter components are discussed in more detail in our blog article, What Is A Power Shower?

FAQ Header Image (How do I know when to change shower cartridges?)

There are a few signs that can indicate that your shower cartridges might need to be changed.

The most common indicator is running or dripping water emerging when your shower system is switched off.

Another sign is when the shower handle becomes difficult to turn, or when it becomes jarred or ‘slips’, and fails to switch on the water.

FAQ Header Image (Can electric showers be dangerous?)

In most scenarios, electricity and water typically represent an extremely dangerous combination. However, electric showers are completely safe provided they are installed correctly.

This is the case on account of the electric heating element being contained within a fully sealed unit. The electric current flows through the element, but not in any way that puts you at risk of suffering a shock.

So all in all, electric shower systems cannot be considered dangerous as long as they are properly fitted.

FAQ Header Image (Can I silicone around an electric shower?)

It is not recommended to silicone around an electric shower system.

In accordance with electrical standards, electric showers are required to be IPX4 rated, which means the shower itself will offer protection from water ingress when the water is sprayed at all angles.

Furthermore, silicone sealant could actually cause potential damage to the shower case, leading to cracking which would allow water ingress to enter.

FAQ Header Image (How can I make my hot water last longer?)

There are three key tips you can follow to make your hot water last longer in relation to your shower systems.

Firstly, you should flush your water heater tank on an annual basis. Nearly every water heater manufacturer would recommend flushing their tanks once a year.

You should also check the anode rod for corrosion, and seek a replacement if it has rusted badly.

Finally, you can insulate your hot water heater tank to make your hot water last longer.

FAQ Header Image (What does a shower cartridge do?)

A shower cartridge will be contained within any working shower system.

The purpose of the shower cartridge is to regulate the flow of water which emerges from the shower head.

FAQ Header Image (What is the purpose of a shower cartridge?)

Shower cartridges can be found within any working shower system.

The purpose of a shower cartridge is to regulate the flow of water which emanates from the shower head.

FAQ Header Image (What do power ratings mean for electric showers?)

Electric shower systems can be categorised by their power ratings, which are measured in kilo-watts (kW). These ratings signify the pressure and power of the water.

Typically, the power ratings of electric showers span between 7.5kW and 10.5kW. In most instances, the more powerful shower systems will prove the most expensive types.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best wattage for an electric shower?)

Electric shower systems are available in a choice of wattages or contrasting power outputs.

In the main, the wattage of electric showers will begin at 7.5 kilowatts (kW), with the most powerful models typically capped at around 10.5kW.

The more powerful electric showers are considered the best options in a broad sense, but it should be noted that the components offering a higher wattage will usually prove more expensive.

FAQ Header Image (Are thermostatic showers any good?)

Thermostatic shower systems are a particularly favourable option to install in homes with young children or elderly relatives.

In short, thermostatic showers provide an excellent level of control over water temperature, offering peace of mind from an anti-scalding perspective.

A hot and cold water supply is required for the successful installation of thermostatic showers.

FAQ Header Image (Why does my electric shower not get hot?)

Water not heating up to the proper extent can be a frequent issue associated with electric shower systems.

There are two main problems that tend to lead to lukewarm water emerging from electric showers – the first of which is a lack of power managing to get through to the micro switch.

The other most common cause is a fault with the heating element, which will curtail the water from heating up in the way that it should.

A micro switch will typically be less expensive to replace than a heating element, so the former problem could prove less troublesome to tackle.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best shower to use with a combi boiler?)

Thermostatic mixer shower systems are generally considered to be the best type to team alongside combi boilers.

This is because thermostatic showers offer the best and closest level of control over water temperature.

Temperature fluctuations can occur, however, if someone else in the house uses hot water, because combi boilers are only capable of producing so much hot water at any one time.

FAQ Header Image (How much water does a 20 minute shower use?)

How much water you use during a 20-minute shower will depend on what type of shower system – and in particular, showerhead – you have installed.

Low-flow showerheads will emit around two gallons of water per minute, equating to 20 gallons per 10-minute shower, and 40 gallons over the course of a 20-minute shower.

If a standard showerhead is fitted, it will use around an extra half a gallon each minute, accounting for a 25-gallon emittance every 10 minutes, or 50 gallons throughout a 20-minute shower.

*1 gallon = 4.54 litres.

FAQ Header Image (How much water does a 10 minute shower use?)

The type of shower system, and especially the showerhead, you have installed will determine how much water a 10-minute shower will use.

If you have a low-flow showerhead installed, you can expect to use about two gallons of water per minute, equalling 20 gallons throughout a 10-minute shower.

With a standard showerhead, around half a gallon more water will emerge each minute, so a 10-minute shower would use somewhere close to 25 gallons.

*1 gallon = 4.54 litres.

FAQ Header Image (What uses more water, a bath or a shower?)

In general, taking a shower will ensure you use less water than when taking a bath.

For shower systems that feature standard showerheads, around 2.5 gallons of water per minute will emerge, so a 10-minute shower will use about 25 gallons of water in total.

By contrast, filling a bath can take up to around 70 gallons of water, depending on the size.

So unless you are spending an hour or so in the shower, you’ll likely use significantly more water when taking a bath.

*1 gallon = 4.54 litres.

FAQ Header Image (What uses the most water in my home?)

Typically, the flushing of the toilet accounts for the majority of household water use. It is responsible for almost 30 per cent of indoor water consumption in an average home.

The next biggest strains on water resource stem from the use of shower systems, or from residents enjoying a relaxing soak in the bathtub.

FAQ Header Image (How much water does a 5 minute shower use?)

What type of shower system you have installed, and especially the showerhead, will help decide how much water will be used over the course of a 5-minute shower.

With a low-flow showerhead, you can expect to use about two gallons of water each minute, equating to 10 gallons over a 5-minute period.

If a standard showerhead is fit, the shower will likely emit around an extra half gallon of water per minute, so a 5-minute shower will use in the region of 12.5 gallons.

*1 gallon = 4.54 litres.

FAQ Header Image (How do I deep clean my shower?)

The best way to deep clean a shower is to firstly remove the shower head from the wall for better access to it.

Then, soak it in a solution consisting of a half and half mixture of white vinegar and water, contained within a sealed plastic bag or a basin.

The vinegar will help to loosen any particles of residue, dirt or grime that are contained on the surface, helping to eliminate the chance of clogging occurring and curtailing water flow.

FAQ Header Image (What kills shower mould?)

You can use any of vinegar, bleach or hydrogen peroxide to kill shower mould, but don’t combine the use of any of them at the same time – this can lead to a toxic reaction.

Ideally, you should open doors and windows whilst applying these solutions, as this will help to dry out any mould that might have attached itself to your shower system, making it easier to remove.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best shower sealant?)

The best shower sealants will be contained in tubes labelled ‘Kitchen & Bath’ or ‘Tub & Tile’.

As that fact would suggest, these types of caulks or sealants will also be effective for bathroom basins and bathtubs, as well as shower enclosures.

Typically, the sealants consist of silicone compounds or acrylic latex, modified chemically to combat damp, and instead attach to smooth surface areas.

FAQ Header Image (How often should you reseal your shower?)

It should be sufficient to reseal your shower every one to two years, depending on how frequently the shower system is used.

Opt for a shower sealant labelled ‘Tub & Tile’ or ‘Kitchen & Bath’ when sealing tile and grout .

Certain types of tiling can prove too thick to properly absorb the sealant, so test the process on a small defined area to begin with.

If the tiling soaks up the sealant successfully, you can seal the full shower enclosure or seal a shower tray. For a more detailed insight, explore our blog, How to Seal a Shower Tray the Right Way.

FAQ Header Image (Can I put new shower sealant over old?)

You should never apply new shower sealant over an old coating. In the vast majority of cases, the old sealant will have cracked or fallen away, so leaks will continue regardless.

Furthermore, the application of new sealant to old will lead the shower enclosure to look messy and uninviting aesthetically.

FAQ Header Image (How long does shower sealant take to dry?)

It might seem that certain shower sealants or caulks are dry to the touch quickly after application, but they actually take around 24 hours to properly cure fully.

The curing process can be sped up or slowed down in accordance with the level of humidity within the shower enclosure, and the home in general.

It is recommended to wait an absolute minimum of three hours, and up to 12 in some cases, before allowing water to come into contact with fresh shower sealant or caulk when sealing a shower tray in the UK.

Find out more in our dedicated blog, How to Seal a Shower Tray the Right Way.

FAQ Header Image (What is the best thickness for a shower door?)

Typically, a stationary shower glass panel will consist of ½ inch thick shower glass.

For a shower door that opens inwards or outwards though, a glass thickness of 3/8s of an inch is preferable.

Although it may seem as though this makes for a thinner shower door, it actually makes for a thicker panel.

FAQ Header Image (How long do shower doors last?)

Provided they are maintained properly, there’s no reason that shower doors won’t last between 20 and 30 years before they require replacement.

Explore a full range of premium quality shower enclosures online with Big Bathroom Shop.

FAQ Header Image (How high should a shower glass door be?)

The average shower glass door measures 72 inches in height.

However, how tall a shower door stands can vary dependent on the weight and width of the product, and the design of the full shower enclosure it is a part of.

FAQ Header Image (Is it healthier to shower in the morning or at night?)

There are benefits to showering in the morning and at night, so there is no obvious preferential time to take a shower be it AM or PM.

Morning showers are helpful for alleviating sleep inertia, and to provide a refreshing boost to set you up for the day ahead. With evening showers, you’re afforded the chance to relax and unwind in preparation for bed.

FAQ Header Image (Why does my showerhead drip after I turn it off?)

Showerheads are susceptible to a build-up of mineral and lime deposits that can potentially block the small holes that populate the component.

This can cause a showerhead to drip once the water supply has been switched off, before stopping eventually. Essentially, the accumulation of limescale and other minerals render the shower head unable to quickly drain, so they hold onto water.

Take a close look at the holes on the showerhead, and clean away any grime or other deposits that could be clogging them. Our guide on how to clean a shower head explains the best cleaning methods to get your showerhead back to tip-top working condition.

FAQ Header Image (Can I use plumber's putty on a shower head?)

You should never use plumber’s putty, also known as pipe dope, when installing shower heads or bathtub spouts.

Such materials have the potential to react with the plastic parts of shower systems, and can ultimately cause breakages as a result.

FAQ Header Image (Why won't my shower stop running?)

If water continues to emerge from your shower once the it has been switched off, it typically indicates a problem with the cartridge.

Shower cartridges are incorporated within the shower system, and they are a device responsible for shutting off water flow and the levels of hot or cold water that exit from the shower head or tap.

The cartridge will inevitably wear out over time and will require replacement. This is likely to be the case if your shower won’t stop running.

FAQ Header Image (How do you get air out of shower pipes?)

To release air that could be trapped in shower pipes, you should switch on both the hot and cold water supplies to around 1/8th of the way on each tap.

Allow the water to run out of the taps for roughly two minutes, starting with the lowest tap in the house all the way up to the highest one.

This will help the water pressure within the system to force the air from the pipes out of the taps throughout the home.

FAQ Header Image (What does PSI stand for in water pressure?)

PSI stands for pounds per square inch in relation to water pressure, indicating the force at which water enters your household from the mains water system.

Typically, homeowners prefer their household water pressure to be within the 40 and 60 PSI range, though safe water pressure gauges can vary between 30 and 80 PSI.

FAQ Header Image (What is a good water pressure for a house?)

Typically, normal water pressure sits at somewhere between 40 and 60 pounds per square inch (PSI). The majority of homeowners like their water pressure to sit somewhere in the middle, at about 50 PSI.

When measuring the water pressure in your household, you can choose to alter it to a setting that suits everyone in the home and all typical household usage.

FAQ Header Image (Where should a rain shower head be placed?)

A rain shower head should be positioned in accordance with personal preference, however they do tend to be ceiling mounted, and cover a large surface area with the water they emit.

As such, shower users will find themselves encapsulated by a large deluge of water, hailing from directly above them, the entire time they are showering.

FAQ Header Image (Do rain shower heads use more water?)

Rain shower heads don’t actually use more water than standard shower heads.

However, you might prefer not to invest in a rain shower head if you live in an area where water costs are notably high. This is because you’ll likely spend more time showering with the luxurious spa-like quality of a rain deluge at your disposal.

You can source water-saving rain shower heads, if you have your heart set on the style but are concerned about a potential impact on your water bills.

FAQ Header Image (Will low water pressure affect my electric shower?)

In some cases, yes. However, the majority of modern electric shower systems are designed for use with a cold mains system with low water pressure.

There are some instances where this is not the case though. You might need to opt for a pumped electric shower if your cold mains plumbing system features notably low or fluctuating pressure.

FAQ Header Image (What wattage electric shower do I need?)

The minimum wattage requirement for an effective electric shower is 8.5kW, or 8,500 Watts.

Typically, electric showers feature power outputs ranging from 8.5 to 10.5kW.

You can decide whether you want an electric shower at the lower or higher end of the power spectrum based on your personal preferences and requirements.

FAQ Header Image (What water flow rate is needed to operate an electric shower?)

The water flow rate for an electric shower must be 8 litres per minute.

Also, a minimum mains water running pressure of 1 bar is needed, whilst the maximum static pressure should be 10 bars or less for this style of modern shower system.

Meanwhile, if you would like to draw inspiration regarding the finest contemporary shower systems to add to your home, take a look at our comprehensive Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.

FAQ Header Image (How much mains water pressure is needed to operate an electric shower?)

A minimum running pressure of 1 bar is required at the mains entry to successfully operate an electric shower system.

The water flow rate must be 8 litres per minute, and the maximum static pressure should not exceed 10 bars.

If you would like to draw any inspiration regarding the finest contemporary showers to add to your home, meanwhile, take a look at our Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.

FAQ Header Image (What is a power shower?)

Power showers work by combining water from the hot and cold water supplies in the home, in the same way that a mixer shower would.

However, power showers then use a pump to bolster the water pressure, which can have a wholly positive effect on homes with low water pressure, making this type of system an especially good fit for properties like this. They represent an ideal modern shower addition in most scenarios.

Our full What Is A Power Shower guide offers a more detailed insight into the features and benefits of power showers. Plus, you can draw inspiration on some of the finest contemporary shower systems to potentially purchase in our Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.

FAQ Header Image (What is an electric shower?)

Electric showers work by quickly heating water over an electrically-charged heating element.

In contrast to mixer and digital shower systems, electric models are a modern shower design that only need a cold water feed to operate successfully.

Furthermore, an electric shower can connect straight into your mains water supply, whereas the likes of mixer showers take a hot water feed directly from the boiler instead.

Our full guide on How to Fit an Electric Shower will come in handy if you do decide to invest in this type of system. And be sure to visit our Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers for inspiration surrounding the best showers to add to your bathroom.

FAQ Header Image (What is a digital shower?)

Digital showers operate in a similar manner to simple mixer showers, in that they are connected to both the hot and cold water supplies in the home.

However, in contrast to standard mixer systems, digital showers work in response to digital signals as opposed to manual ones.

In essence, they negate the need for physical controls such as shower handles, with the water flow and temperature adjustable via touch buttons, sensors or a remote control.

For a more detailed insight, take a look at our full blog piece, Digital Showers – Innovative Technology For Your Bathroom. Or, if you would like inspiration surrounding the best shower systems to potentially add to your home, explore our Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.

FAQ Header Image (What is a mixer shower?)

Essentially, a mixer shower is a modern shower set that connects to both the hot and cold water supplies in the home.

They are dubbed mixer showers as they take water from each supply, before mixing it together in a valve and carrying it to the shower head. The water flow then emerges from the shower head, typically at a more powerful rate than you would find with an electric shower.

Our guide on How to Install a Thermostatic Mixer Shower features helpful tips for fitting a mixer shower system, should you decide to invest in one. Or, for inspiration on all sorts of potential shower system upgrades, take a look at our Buyer’s Guide To Modern Showers.