Frequently Asked Bathroom Questions


FAQs for toilets

FAQ Header Image (What is the most popular toilet roll holder finish?)

Chrome is typically the most popular toilet roll holder finish, and the same can be said about the majority of bathroom accessories in general. Primarily, this is the case on account of chrome meshing well with pretty much any sort of décor and fixtures and fittings within a bathroom.

With that noted, there is a multitude of alternative popular toilet roll holder finishes as well. Black bathroom accessories are extremely sought after in modern bathroom areas, and the same can be said of black toilet roll holders specifically.

Meanwhile, wooden toilet roll holders are another popular style, most often for traditionally themed bathroom areas.

To find out more, take a look at our blog, How To Choose The Right Toilet Roll Holder.

FAQ Header Image (What is the most popular type of toilet roll holder?)

Wall mounted toilet roll holders are traditionally the most popular type available, and amongst the most commonly found bathroom accessories.

That said, there is now a wide variety of freestanding toilet roll holder models on the market too, often incorporating a tiered design for useful additional bathroom storage. These free standing toilet roll holder stands are an excellent choice for homeowners against the idea of drilling into their bathroom wall.

For a deeper insight, take a look at our dedicated blog, How To Choose The Right Toilet Roll Holder.

FAQ Header Image (How much does a standard toilet installation cost?)

A standard bathroom toilet installation will usually cost in the region of £350, and take between two to three hours to complete.

These expenses should be included in a new bathroom cost calculator when drawing up a budget for renovation work, and working out an overall new bathroom cost for your property.

For full details, take a look at our dedicated blog – How Much Should A New Bathroom Cost?

FAQ Header Image (How much do back to wall toilets cost?)

Back to wall toilets from Big Bathroom Shop can cost anything from £100 for the cheapest model up to £1950 for the most expensive, with all sorts of different designs priced anywhere in between.

Price discrepancies are based on a variety of factors, including technological features, finishes and accompanying items within bundles, so there’s an ideal back to wall home toilet option to suit any space and all budgetary requirements. For further information, explore our dedicated blog, Why To Upgrade To A Back To Wall Toilet.

FAQ Header Image (Does a back to wall toilet need a WC unit?)

A WC unit is not an essential accompaniment to a back to wall toilet, however it is a highly recommended addition. And many back to wall toilets come supplied in cohesion with units as standard, which can help to create a nicer aesthetic overall.

The only instance in which a unit is not necessary is if a back to wall toilet is being fitted directly onto the wall. In such cases, invasive plumbing work would be required to successfully install the back to wall toilet in the first place, and key parts would be more difficult to reach should any repair work be required in future.

Take a look at our blog, Why To Upgrade To A Back To Wall Toilet, for a better insight into all aspects of this favourable modern home toilet option.

FAQ Header Image (What are back to wall toilets made out of?)

Back to wall toilets predominantly feature a high quality ceramic construction, providing a robust and durable performance in addition to a pleasing glossy aesthetic and an easy-to-clean surface.

For back to wall toilets accompanied by WC units, the units themselves could incorporate the same makeup as the residential toilet, or might be made from a different material entirely such as wood or MDF. If you would like a better insight into back to wall toilets on the whole, explore our blog, Why To Upgrade To A Back To Wall Toilet.

FAQ Header Image (What is a back to wall toilet?)

A back to wall toilet will boast a streamlined design, and incorporate a toilet pan fitted against the wall, as well as a neatly concealed toilet cistern held either within the wall or a separate unit.

Perfect for enhancing space, they make for an especially prudent addition to a compact bathroom or en-suite area.

There’s plenty more information to be found about this particular type of home toilet within our blog, Why To Upgrade To A Back To Wall Toilet.

FAQ Header Image (What is the difference between a close coupled toilet and a back to wall toilet?)

A close coupled toilet is a model whereby the toilet cistern is positioned directly on the back of the toilet pan. By contrast, back to wall toilets incorporate a concealed cistern, with the toilet pan installed against the wall or an accompanying unit.

Our Toilet Buyer’s Guide offers a full insight into all different types of home toilets. Meanwhile, we have a blog entitled Why To Upgrade To A Back To Wall Toilet for a closer look at those styles specifically.

FAQ Header Image (Are back to wall toilets a good idea?)

A back to wall toilet is an excellent idea to provide a modern, space saving version of an essential fixture within a bathroom area.

Space is maximised to terrific effect by just the toilet bowl, and potentially the accompanying unit, being on display. It also leaves the bowl in the ideal position for maintenance and cleaning. All factors which make back to wall toilets an especially prudent home toilet option for compact bathrooms especially.

To find out more information on this specific type of toilet, take a look at our full blog article, Why To Upgrade To A Back To Wall Toilet.

FAQ Header Image (Are wall hung toilets a good idea?)

Wall hung toilets are an excellent choice with regards to creating a modern, minimalistic bathroom aesthetic whilst maximizing potentially limited space.

A wall mounted toilet is generally considered to be a more design-oriented option in comparison with other types of home toilets, such as traditional floor-mounted toilets, for instance.

For a more detailed insight into the virtues of wall hung toilets, take a look at our dedicated blog, Why Buy Wall Hung Toilets?

FAQ Header Image (How do you unblock a wall hung toilet?)

You can typically use the same techniques to unblock a wall hung toilet as you would with any other type of residential toilet.

Firstly, boil 2 litres of water, and allow for it to cool down whilst pouring a single cup of baking soda and two cups of vinegar into the toilet bowl. A chemical reaction will ensue, creating plenty of fizz that will tackle and loosen the clog.

Add in the hot water and leave the mixture to work its magic overnight, before flushing the toilet in the morning, and your wall mounted toilet should be back to working like brand new.

For a better insight into all things wall hung toilets, explore our dedicated blog, Why Buy Wall Hung Toilets?

FAQ Header Image (Is there a weight limit for wall hung toilets?)

The weight limit for wall hung toilets is generally considered to be 35.7 stones, equating to 500 pounds or 226.8 kilograms.

Basic physics dictates that residential toilets featuring this sort of design can only weigh up to a certain amount, so as not to pose too great a level of stress on the wall they are attached to, and remain fully operational without becoming loose.

Explore our Why Buy Wall Hung Toilets blog for further information surrounding wall mounted toilets and their beneficial design.

FAQ Header Image (Are wall hung toilets reliable?)

Wall hung toilets are a very reliable and attractive home toilet proposition for modern homeowners, provided they have been subject to a professional installation.

There is a notion that wall mounted toilets are susceptible to becoming loose over time, in light of the pressure their weight exerts on the wall they are attached to. However, as aforementioned, a thorough, careful and professional installation process should ensure a reliable wall hung toilet performance for many years to come.

Our blog, Why Buy Wall Hung Toilets, offers further information regarding all the advantages provided by wall mounted toilets.

FAQ Header Image (Are wall hung toilets problematic?)

Certainly not overly so. The most common minor complaints surrounding wall hung toilets relate to an installation process that can prove more difficult than other types of home toilets.

The only other issue a wall mounted toilet can present is for it to loosen in due course as a result of the pressure exerted on the wall. The best way to combat either potential problem is to commit to a professional installation, even if it means an added initial outlay.

There’s plenty more information about the ins and outs of wall hung toilets in our dedicated blog, Why Buy A Wall Hung Toilet.

FAQ Header Image (How high should a wall hung toilet be from the floor?)

It depends on the size and preference of the user(s), but wall hung toilets should be installed anywhere between 15 and 19 inches up from the floor.

The standard height for a wall hung toilet to be fitted off the ground is generally considered to be 15 inches. But users with special requirements, or elderly people, might prefer their home toilets to be positioned slightly higher, making them easier to sit on.

A full insight into the ideal wall hung toilet height can be found in our blog, Why Buy Wall Hung Toilets?

FAQ Header Image (How does a toilet sink combo work?)

The general idea of a toilet sink combo involves the toilet and sink communicating between each other, with the water used being recycled between the fixtures.

For instance, the water you use to wash your hands can then be recycled and used to flush the toilet. The way in which the two elements can combine can vary.

Explore our Toilet and Basin Buying Guide for a more detailed insight into the merits of toilet sink combos and all other types.

FAQ Header Image (How do toilet sink combos work?)

Generally, toilet sink combos foster communication between the toilet and sink, with the water they use being recycled between each component.

For example, the water you use to wash your hands can then be recycled for the flushing of the toilet. The manner in which each elements combine can vary.

Take a look at our Toilet and Basin Buying Guide for a better insight into the advantages of toilet sink combos and any other types.

FAQ Header Image (Does a downstairs toilet add value to a home?)

A downstairs toilet area or cloakroom suite fitting will usually add about 5% value onto a home. Acting upon any inspirational downstairs cloakroom ideas will generally boost the level of your property’s value.

If you need some inspiration surrounding the best options for downstairs toilet projects, take a look at our blog, Fabulous Downstairs Toilet Ideas.

FAQ Header Image (Do I need permission to install a downstairs toilet?)

In the majority of instances, you won’t need permission to install a downstairs toilet or fittings such as cloakroom suites, so long as you don’t have to adjust the exterior of your property.

However, it is still a good idea to check with your local council before beginning invasive work such as a downstairs toilet installation or implementing your downstairs cloakroom ideas of any sort.

For an insight into some of the best downstairs toilet installation ideas, explore our blog, Fabulous Downstairs Toilet Ideas.

FAQ Header Image (Which type of toilets are easiest to clean?)

One-piece, wall-hung toilets are the easiest type to clean.

These types of toilets incorporate a sleeker profile and feature less crevices than two-piece, traditional toilets, for instance, which makes them much easier to clean.

For a full insight into the most desirable toilets on the market, take a look at our Toilet & Basin Buying Guide.

FAQ Header Image (Why are some toilets more expensive?)

Toilet design is the main factor in determining why some toilets cost more than others.

Generally speaking, one-piece, wall hung toilets tend to be more expensive than alternative styles. They incorporate a slick, sleeker appearance than their counterparts, and feature less crevices which makes them easier to clean.

Two-piece, traditional toilets are the most common design available, and usually the most competitively priced in turn. They also remain the type that incorporates the biggest variety of styles.

For a look at the very best toilets to consider for your home, explore our Toilet & Basin Buying Guide.

FAQ Header Image (What toilet should I buy?)

In general, one-piece, wall-hung toilets are widely considered to be the best type to buy when upgrading a contemporary home.

This type is amongst the most popular style of modern toilets on the market, with the one main drawback being that they tend to prove more expensive than alternative models.

For a full insight into which toilets are the best to buy and most ideally suited to your space, explore our Toilet & Basin Buying Guide.

FAQ Header Image (Do black toilets require less cleaning?)

Conversely, black toilets usually require more cleaning.

Like any toilets, black components will gather transparent mineral build-ups on the surface of the bowl. However, these conglomerations are a lot easier to spot on a dark surface, so a black bowl will necessitate extra cleaning to maintain a spotless look.

For more insight into selecting the perfect toilet for your home, consult our Toilet & Basin Buying Guide.

FAQ Header Image (Are dual flush toilets worth it?)

Dual flush toilets combine both low volume and high volume flushes within a single toilet unit.

Low volume flushes are designed to accommodate liquid waste, with high volume systems designed for solid waste.

As such, dual flush toilets enable the user to preserve water by utilising the liquid waste setting.

Dual flush toilets will allow for lower levels of water usage within a home, helping you to trim your water bill from month to month.

Our Toilet & Basin Buying Guide has all the information you could need to help you make an informed decision about which type of toilet to invest in.

FAQ Header Image (Is it bad to leave bleach in the toilet?)

Yes. You should try and avoid using bleach in the toilet when possible, and opting instead to apply a non-chemical cleaner such as soapy water for cleaning purposes.

In doing so, you’ll avoid causing potential damage to the glazing on the porcelain surface of the toilet.

If you do need to add bleach to tackle particularly tough stains, try to do so sparingly.

FAQ Header Image (What uses the most water in my home?)

Typically, the flushing of the toilet accounts for the majority of household water use. It is responsible for almost 30 per cent of indoor water consumption in an average home.

The next biggest strains on water resource stem from the use of shower systems, or from residents enjoying a relaxing soak in the bathtub.

FAQ Header Image (What does PSI stand for in water pressure?)

PSI stands for pounds per square inch in relation to water pressure, indicating the force at which water enters your household from the mains water system.

Typically, homeowners prefer their household water pressure to be within the 40 and 60 PSI range, though safe water pressure gauges can vary between 30 and 80 PSI.

FAQ Header Image (What is a good water pressure for a house?)

Typically, normal water pressure sits at somewhere between 40 and 60 pounds per square inch (PSI). The majority of homeowners like their water pressure to sit somewhere in the middle, at about 50 PSI.

When measuring the water pressure in your household, you can choose to alter it to a setting that suits everyone in the home and all typical household usage.